Narrated Art

DEFINITION

A narrated art project includes an image, which can be a drawing or photo, shared with accompanying audio narration.

WORKFLOW

Initial Setup

  1. Create an account on a free web service listed under “tools” below.
  2. If you have a mobile device, download and install the app for the service you’re using.
  3. If you’re using a desktop or laptop computer, obtain and test a microphone if you don’t have a built-in mic.
  4. Test the website and the narrated slideshow PUBLISHING process in the location / on the network you will use with students.

Ongoing Use

  1. Login to your app or website.
  2. Click record and record your audio narration.
  3. Take a photo of your art or select an existing image from your photo library.
  4. Enter the meta data (title, description, etc) for each episode.
  5. Click upload.

TOOLS

The following table compares seven available websites/apps for creating narrated art projects.

narrated-art-tools-march2013

Narrated Art Projects with Single Images / Photos

  1. AudioBoo (free iOS/Android app & browser-based, free accounts limited to 3 min per episode)
  2. SoundCloud (free iOS/Android & browser-based, free accounts limited to upload time per month)
  3. Narrable (free iOS app & browser-based, limited to 5 min per episode)
  4. Draw and Tell ($2 iOS app, no time limit, exports as camera roll videos)
  5. Tell About This ($3 iOS app – designed for 4-6 year olds: @TellAboutThis)

Narrated Art Projects with Multiple Images / Photos

  1. VoiceThread (free, iOS & browser-based)
  2. EduCreations (free iOS app & browser-based)

Live Art Screencasts

  1. Ask3 (free iPad app)
  2. Other Screencasting tools listed on the Narrated Slideshow / Screencasting page

Story Wheel (free iOS app) is a storytelling app which lets users narrate randomly selected images.

TUTORIALS & VIDEOS

STUDENT EXAMPLES WITH ART

  1. Horses Boo (5th grade – AudioBoo – integrated into a Radio Show also)
  2. Name Art by Rachel (3rd grade – AudioBoo – YouTube screencast version)
  3. Hyperbola Equation and Graph (9th grade – Narrable – YouTube screencast version)
  4. Discussing Oak Ridge Glogster Project (8th grade – SoundCloud – YouTube screencast version)
  5. Kindergarten Book Review (AudioBoo)
  6. Narrated Art About Bats (3rd grade – AudioBoo)
  7. Emily’s Narrative Art (AudioBoo)
  8. Austin’s Alien Gingerbread Story (2nd grade – AudioBoo)
  9. Thankful Stories by Peg Keiner (backstory)

STUDENT EXAMPLES WITH PHOTOS

  1. Student-Created Sequoyah Book Reports, AudioBoo, iPads and QR Codes (4th / 5th grade)
  2. Flamingos at the Zoo (2nd grade – AudioBoo)
  3. US Arizona Impressions (Kindergarten – AudioBoo)

EDUCATOR EXAMPLES

  1. How Can Someone Hack Your Website in a Coffee Shop? (live art screencast – Ask3 for iPad)
  2. The Flipped Classroom as a Vehicle to the Future (time-lapse video – Camtasia Studio)
  3. Storychasing Philmont 2012 (with photos – AudioBoo)

THE NEXT LEVEL

Narrated Art Video: The Flipped Classroom as a Vehicle to the Future (YouTube)

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

Narrated Art Projects: Draw a picture or take a picture, and then record your voice with a website or app which shares your recording with your image. Narrated Art Projects provide excellent opportunities to practice meta-cognition, use nonlinguistic representation to boost student achievement, and improve oral communication skills. In this workshop we’ll view and discuss examples of student-created narrated art, and also create examples together in the session. Websites like AudioBoo and SoundCloud offer cloud-based audio recording and sharing using free smartphone applications as well as browser-based interfaces. Apps like ShowMe and Draw & Tell for iPad can streamline the creation and sharing of narrated art. Learn how narrated art projects can become important elements in students’ digital portfolios.

* Image attribution: Digital drawing created by Wesley Fryer on Brushes for iPad

Permanent link to this article: http://maps.playingwithmedia.com/narrated-art/

1 comment

15 pings

  1. Jackie says:

    Great work. I’m always so inspired after being on your blog.

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